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Nutrition and Healthy Cooking Tips

Taking Off Those Psych Med Pounds

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Updated August 11, 2012

In the battle to lose weight gained from psychiatric meds, knowledge about healthy cooking, nutritional supplements and calories can be an important tool. Here are some tips to help you.
  • Evaluating Natural Weight Control Supplements
    This is a must-read. Alternative Medicine Guide Cathy Wong gives essential information about several supplements. None of them seems to have been proven effective, and many present some real problems. If you are considering a supplement, please check this article to see if it is listed. Even if it is not, consult your pharmacist or doctor. You could do yourself real harm with the wrong "natural" supplement.

  • Top Ten Suggestions for Diet Baking
    Baking Guide Carroll Pellegrinelli gives her top ten suggestions for baking healthy desserts and still having good taste.

  • Buttermilk!
    Happy information about this lowfat food from Home Cooking Guide Peggy Trowbridge. Links at the bottom lead to more information, a substitution chart, and tons of recipes, including this low fat devil's food cake.

  • Calorie Calculator and Nutrition Guide for Men and Women
    I checked this calorie calculator against two other popular programs and it comes out with basically the same answers. I like this one because it tells you how many calories a day will help you reach your goal with or without exercise. However, since many of us take meds that lead to weight gain, these figures are going to be high for us. Adjust down accordingly.

  • How Much Protein Do You Need?
    Atkins dieters won't like this one, but it has sound nutritional sense behind it. For those of us cutting down, this is a helpful article by the Exercise Guide.

  • Calorie Count Plus This free calorie count program from About.com has an extensive food database (so you don't have to look up nutritional information for everything you eat) and a good calculator. It takes into account the amount of exercise you are already doing and you can adjust if you increase or decrease your activity level. I think the total came out a little high, but again, I adjusted my total intake down because of my meds.

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